May I suggest that too much of our view of authority hinges on Colossians 3:17 meaning, ‘by the authority of the Lord Jesus’? and from that understanding, the assumption that this means we must have book, chapter, and verse in everything we do. According to Bauer, Danker, Arndt, and Gingrich, ‘in the name of X’ in the majority of case is to make mentions of the name, while naming, or calling on the name

There aren’t exact correspondences to the way it used in the NT, but Psalm of Solomon has, (8) “Let the Lord do what He hath spoken concerning Israel and Jerusalem; Let the Lord raise up Israel by His glorious name.”This is the typical Jewish way of doing something in the name of the Lord while naming the Lord, and wearing it properly. The command ‘not to take the name of the Lord in vain’ does not mean, don’t say, Lord or God flippantly, but we are to ‘wear’ (nasa) the name of the Lord as to correctly represent him. Another example we have in the Old Testament is from Moses, And it shall be, that the firstborn which she beareth shall succeed in the name of his brother which is dead, that his name be not put out of Israel. Not that his authority would be put out of Israel, but the memory of his name and everything that was connected to it. (Deut 25:6). Those in David’s ragtag bunch went to Nabal ‘in the name of David’ that is on David’s behalf, David certainly was not commanding food, but entreating for help ‘David’s young men went and said all these things to Nabal on David’s behalf, and they waited. 10 Nabal asked them, “Who is David? Who is Jesse’s son? Many slaves these days are running away from their masters.’ (1 Sam 25:8-10). Here implicitly, we have them coming on David’s behalf (literally, in his name), and also using his name in the entreaty; Nabal responded, ‘who is David’?

With these things in mind, and of course that was not a journey of the phrase but more like a walk in the park, I find it more likely that Paul is drawing from his Jewish roots in his use of ‘in the name of Jesus’. What we do and say is a synecdoche for our lives. Because we are raised with Christ (Col 3:1), and have been summed up in his very person (Colossians 3:15); it is most fitting to allows his teachings to take residents in our hearts, we should be characterized with wisdom, when we teach and admonish each other, our lives should be filled with songs and the calling upon the name of Jesus, through whom we give thanks to God our Father. This explanation makes sense of Paul’s Jewish roots and his understanding of scripture, and also, does not have him on one hand continually emphasizing the grace and freedom with have in the Messiah (Romans 14, Galatians 5:22-23), but then on the other hand arguing that before you can take a single breath, or wear a sneaker, or even begin to do normal daily routine you need to have a scripture, chapter, and verse that authorizes it.
we give thanks to God our Father. This explanation makes sense of Paul’s Jewish roots and his understanding of scripture, and also, does not have him on one hand continually emphasizing the grace and freedom with have in the Messiah (Romans 14, Galatians 5:22-23), but then on the other hand arguing that before you can take a single breath, or wear a sneaker, or even begin to do normal daily routine you need to have a scripture, chapter, and verse that authorizes it.